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Paul Burrell, 65, reveals he's been given the 'all clear' following his cancer battle and tells how The Crown 'is going to upset a lot of people' for its 'misinterpretation' of Princess Diana


Paul Burrell has proudly admitted that he was given the ‘all clear’ from doctors after his his long battle with prostate cancer, as he spoke with Lorraine on Thursday.

The former royal butler, 65, also shed light on the new series of The Crown, which released earlier today, and told how ‘it is going to upset a lot of people’.

During his appearance on the ITV morning show, Paul, who worked beside and was a confidante of Diana, Princess of Wales, for ten years until her death in 1997, shared his incredible health update.

He said: ‘Well I’m happy to tell you I saw my consultant last week and she gave me the all clear.

‘My number came down from 10 to something like 0.06, so it’s good news and I’ll continue with the hormone therapy, which is a bit of a pain because I put on a little bit of weight, I’m getting more emotional than usual and hot sweats.’

Cancer free: Paul Burrell, 65, has proudly admitted that he was given the ‘all clear’ from doctors after his his long battle with prostate cancer, as he spoke with Lorraine on Thursday

Opening up: The former royal butler also shed light on the new series of The Crown, which released earlier today, and told how 'it is going to upset a lot of people' (pictured with Princess Diana in 1997)

Opening up: The former royal butler also shed light on the new series of The Crown, which released earlier today, and told how ‘it is going to upset a lot of people’ (pictured with Princess Diana in 1997)

He joked to Lorraine: ‘I can now sympathize!’

Lorraine laughed: ‘For most of us women of a certain age, you know exactly what it’s like, but it’s great that you’re doing so well and also you’ve been raising awareness as well so that’s the main thing as well.’

In April, Paul proudly rang the bell after revealing he had completed radiotherapy treatment for his cancer.

Paul was diagnosed with the disease last summer.

Paul admitted I’m A Celebrity All Stars ‘literally saved my life’ thanks to health tests before heading off to film the show in South Africa which later revealed he had cancer.

Alongside eight other celebrities, Paul was in Kruger National Park in north-eastern South Africa, one of Africa’s largest game reserves to film for the first ever I’m A Celebrity series featuring previous stars of the jungle.

But after coming home to the UK, Paul was handed some heartbreaking news which followed up on some health checks taken before his trip.

Elsewhere in the interview with Lorraine, Paul joined royal correspondent Russell Myers to discuss the controversy around the new series of The Crown.

Emotional: During his appearance on the ITV morning show, Paul said: 'Well I'm happy to tell you I saw my consultant last week and she gave me the all clear'

Emotional: During his appearance on the ITV morning show, Paul said: ‘Well I’m happy to tell you I saw my consultant last week and she gave me the all clear’

Incredible: In April, Paul proudly rang the bell after revealing he had completed radiotherapy treatment for his cancer

Incredible: In April, Paul proudly rang the bell after revealing he had completed radiotherapy treatment for his cancer 

Support: Paul previously admitted I'm A Celebrity All Stars 'literally saved my life' thanks to health tests before heading off to film the show in South Africa which later revealed he had cancer

Support: Paul previously admitted I’m A Celebrity All Stars ‘literally saved my life’ thanks to health tests before heading off to film the show in South Africa which later revealed he had cancer

Discussion: Elsewhere in the interview with Lorraine, Paul joined royal correspondent Russel Myers to discuss the controversy around the new series of The Crown (pictured Lorraine)

Discussion: Elsewhere in the interview with Lorraine, Paul joined royal correspondent Russel Myers to discuss the controversy around the new series of The Crown (pictured Lorraine)

Confidante: Paul worked beside and was a confidante of Diana, Princess of Wales, for ten years until her death in 1997 (Diana pictured in 1997)

Confidante: Paul worked beside and was a confidante of Diana, Princess of Wales, for ten years until her death in 1997 (Diana pictured in 1997)

The Crown controversy: He said: 'I can't watch that, it's too graphic and too much. It will upset William and Harry and upset a lot of people watching that. It's very emotional isn't it'

The Crown controversy: He said: ‘I can’t watch that, it’s too graphic and too much. It will upset William and Harry and upset a lot of people watching that. It’s very emotional isn’t it’

As a preview from a clip of leading up too Diana’s crash in The Crown appeared on screen, Paul had to look away as he finds it ‘too difficult’ to watch.

He said: ‘I can’t watch that, it’s too graphic and too much. It will upset William and Harry and upset a lot of people watching that. It’s very emotional isn’t it.

He added: ‘I find this very difficult this series I don’t know if I can watch it. I found it easier to watch it at the beginning, the first series of The Crown because it’s far enough away isn’t it, in history for us to be not emotionally involved.

‘But this series, I am emotionally invested in it and  I am going to be critical of it because it is a dramatisation of it. It’s Hollywood, it’s not real life.

‘I personally think the Princess was misrepresented and  misinterpreted all her life, and here we go again with The Crown, it’s not the real Diana. 

‘The real Diana I knew was a fighter, she wasn’t shy and retiring, she fought for what she believed in and she fought for her boys.’

WHAT IS PROSTATE CANCER?

How many people does it kill? 

More than 11,800 men a year – or one every 45 minutes – are killed by the disease in Britain, compared with about 11,400 women dying of breast cancer.

It means prostate cancer is behind only lung and bowel in terms of how many people it kills in Britain. 

In the US, the disease kills 26,000 men each year.

Despite this, it receives less than half the research funding of breast cancer and treatments for the disease are trailing at least a decade behind.

How many men are diagnosed annually?

Every year, upwards of 52,300 men are diagnosed with prostate cancer in the UK – more than 140 every day.   

How quickly does it develop? 

Prostate cancer usually develops slowly, so there may be no signs someone has it for many years, according to the NHS

If the cancer is at an early stage and not causing symptoms, a policy of ‘watchful waiting’ or ‘active surveillance’ may be adopted. 

Some patients can be cured if the disease is treated in the early stages.

But if it is diagnosed at a later stage, when it has spread, then it becomes terminal and treatment revolves around relieving symptoms.

Thousands of men are put off seeking a diagnosis because of the known side effects from treatment, including erectile dysfunction.

Tests and treatment

Tests for prostate cancer are haphazard, with accurate tools only just beginning to emerge. 

There is no national prostate screening programme as for years the tests have been too inaccurate.

Doctors struggle to distinguish between aggressive and less serious tumours, making it hard to decide on treatment.

Men over 50 are eligible for a ‘PSA’ blood test which gives doctors a rough idea of whether a patient is at risk.

But it is unreliable. Patients who get a positive result are usually given a biopsy which is also not fool-proof. 

Scientists are unsure as to what causes prostate cancer, but age, obesity and a lack of exercise are known risks. 

Anyone with any concerns can speak to Prostate Cancer UK’s specialist nurses on 0800 074 8383 or visit prostatecanceruk.org



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