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‘Casualty, casualty, casualty!’ Dramatic moment nuclear submarine crew member is taken ill


‘Casualty, casualty, casualty!’ Dramatic moment nuclear submarine crew member is taken ill before being evacuated in the middle of the Atlantic features in Channel 5 documentary

  • ‘Casualty, casualty!’ is announced from one of the HMS Trenchant’s speakers
  • Footage from C5’s Submarine: Life Under the Waves shows crew rushing to help
  • Crew member has to be evacuated in middle of the Atlantic in dangerous seas
  • Submarine: Life Under The Waves – September 13 and 20 – 9pm, Channel 5 

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Dramatic footage has revealed how casualties are dealt with under the waves as for the first time British cameras have been given access on board a hunter-killer submarine. 

‘Casualty, casualty, casualty!’ is announced from one of the intercom speakers on board HMS Trenchant before crewmates are seen scrambling to get first aid supplies to the right area of the vessel. 

The footage, from Channel 5’s new documentary Submarine: Life Under the Waves, shows the medical party rushing to the nuclear reactor where the incident took place. 

The crew member has to be evacuated in the middle of the Atlantic, forcing the submarine to surface even though rough seas make removing him from the boat extremely dangerous.   

Pictured: Crew members on board HMS Trenchant. Left to right: Andy Pandyan, Jon Sheldon, Dave Burrell, Jim Reid, Andy Benzie

The footage, from Channel 5's new documentary Submarine: Life Under the Waves, shows the medical party rushing to the nuclear reactor where the incident took place. Pictured: Crew member Charlie Drake

The footage, from Channel 5’s new documentary Submarine: Life Under the Waves, shows the medical party rushing to the nuclear reactor where the incident took place. Pictured: Crew member Charlie Drake 

HMS Trenchant is a 5,300-tonne nuclear submarine on its four-month tour of duty in the mid-Atlantic

HMS Trenchant is a 5,300-tonne nuclear submarine on its four-month tour of duty in the mid-Atlantic

HMS Trenchant is a 5,300-tonne nuclear submarine on its four-month tour of duty in the mid-Atlantic. 

It was first launched by war hero Vice Admiral Sir Arthur Hezlet, commander of the original HMS Trenchant submarine, during World War II. 

In scenes reminiscent of the BBC drama Vigil set on a submarine, the documentary shows how the crew are forced to live in extremely close quarters while helping guard the UK’s Trident missiles and keep British waters safe.  

In scenes reminiscent of the BBC drama Vigil set on a submarine, the documentary shows how the crew are forced to live in extremely close quarters while helping guard the UK's Trident missiles and keep British waters safe. Pictured: Captain Stephen Brian

In scenes reminiscent of the BBC drama Vigil set on a submarine, the documentary shows how the crew are forced to live in extremely close quarters while helping guard the UK’s Trident missiles and keep British waters safe. Pictured: Captain Stephen Brian 

The submarine was first launched by war hero Vice Admiral Sir Arthur Hezlet, commander of the original HMS Trenchant submarine, during World War II. Pictured: Luke Thompson

The submarine was first launched by war hero Vice Admiral Sir Arthur Hezlet, commander of the original HMS Trenchant submarine, during World War II. Pictured: Luke Thompson 

The first episode of the docuseries, which airs on Monday at 9pm, shows the crew preparing the 279-foot submarine to leave port for the first time in six months. Pictured: Danny Parsons, Alex Moor and an HM Trenchant diver

The first episode of the docuseries, which airs on Monday at 9pm, shows the crew preparing the 279-foot submarine to leave port for the first time in six months. Pictured: Danny Parsons, Alex Moor and an HM Trenchant diver

Pictured is one of the HMS Trenchant's crew members Adam Hughes

Pictured is one of the HMS Trenchant’s crew members Adam Hughes 

The first episode of the docuseries, which airs on Monday at 9pm, shows the crew preparing the 279-foot submarine to leave port for the first time in six months. 

Enough food is loaded on the vessel to last 120 days while they voyage to protect another British submarine that’s carrying Trident nuclear missiles. 

But early on the crew’s fridge breaks down and threatens the ship’s entire supply of fresh food.  

And when that crisis is conquered a fire in the engine room breaks out forcing the ship to return to port for repairs during an urgent mission to find a Russian submarine. 

In the next episode of the series chaos ensues when the submarine’s toilets suffer a major blockage and all seven bathrooms are closed for several hours, leaving the crew unable to use them while the ship tries to stop Russian vessels from entering British waters.  

A Russian submarine is soon discovered heading towards the UK and Trenchant is forced to respond and defend British waters. 

Submarine: Life Under The Waves – Monday September 13 and 20 – 9pm, Channel 5

How submarines create oxygen using sea water: 10 facts about life under the waves 

  • Submarines can stay underwater for months, meaning the crew often go long periods without seeing daylight or breathing fresh air.
  • Drinking water is filtered from the sea through a machine that’s powered by electricity produced from a nuclear power plant.
  • Similarly, oxygen is produced by passing electricity through sea water to separate the oxygen from the hydrogen.
  • Submarines can all fire torpedos, but some can also fire land attack missiles and others can also fire missiles with nuclear warheads.
  • Submarines are home to a crew of over 100 men and women.
  • At sea, submarine crews work in shift patterns of 6 hours on, 6 hours off with no days off.
  • Submarine missions are classified, not all know the details of the mission and those that do are forbidden to speak about them.
  • The submarine’s control room – the nerve centre of the boat – is roughly the size of an average living room.
  • The British submarine service is recognised as one of the most elite of its type in the world.
  • The UK nuclear deterrent includes the submarine (currently the Vanguard Class), the Trident II D-5 missile and the Warhead.
  • Royal Navy submarines have provided the UK’s Continuous At Sea Deterrent (CASD), colloquially known today as Trident, for over 50 years, assuring the safety of the UK and our NATO allies now, and for as long as the global security situation makes it necessary.

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